How to scam eBay sellers and get all your items for free!

Yeah, I’m not going to tell you how to do that. But apparently this guy is!

I was surfing around Amazon earlier and came across this book.

Here is the description:


There are hundreds of ‘how to’ eBay books out there, but none like this one! Never before has anyone dared to tell the TRUTH! Fraud, blackmail,aggressive traders and deliberate attempts to con traders out of products and money seems to be the order of the day. This book will show you that if you can suspend your moral values for just a few days you can make a fortune on eBay! Real life cases studies are offered about eBayers who blatantly do not understand the laws of copyright, trademarks or more disturbingly the moral rights of others. Learn how to buy just about anything – and get your money back!

Using the Search Inside the Book feature I took a little look at this book and essentially it seems to have been (poorly) written by a disgruntled eBay seller who, frustrated with buyers scamming him, decided to teach other people how to scam. . . ? I’m not sure I follow the logic. But the book seems to mainly discuss ways to manipulate sellers and PayPal charge backs to get your money back on everything you purchase. There are no reviews so its anyone’s guess as to whether his ideas work or if he is just ranting.

Not having read this book, I’m not sure if I should be annoyed or not, but, if the book really teaches what it claims, how is such a book allowed to exist? Are there books out there on how to do other illegal things? This is a world I didn’t know existed.

I want to report him to someone for. . . something. Grr!

Now, not to get all therapist on you but, how does this make you feel?

Author: Hillary DePiano

Selling online since 1997, Hillary is the author of several books and eBooks about ecommerce and publishing including Beyond Amazon, eBay, and Etsy and Sell Their Stuff. She also writes fiction and is a bestselling playwright when you aren't looking. For a complete list of books, plays and projects, visit HillaryDePiano.com.

Share This Post On
  • Mike

    This works! We are about ready to stop selling on both eBay and Amazon because of scammers.

    Amazon not only allows it they make sure that sellers loose their product and the money for it because of bogus A-Z complaints from scammer buyers. If you question or defend your service and product you get bad feedback and Amazon will kick you off their site for it.

    They state that you MUST give refunds…This is not right.

  • Mike

    This works! We are about ready to stop selling on both eBay and Amazon because of scammers.

    Amazon not only allows it they make sure that sellers loose their product and the money for it because of bogus A-Z complaints from scammer buyers. If you question or defend your service and product you get bad feedback and Amazon will kick you off their site for it.

    They state that you MUST give refunds…This is not right.

  • Ella

    Precisely! Amazon.co.uk are more than happy to aid buyers to defraud sellers via their A-Z guarantee. Buyers can now get items at sellers’ expense by simply awaiting the arrival of their item & filing an A-Z guarantee. They can then send empty packages with tracking numbers and claim that they have returned the merchandise. Amazon then issue a full refund in response. I’m not surprised such a book exists – unfortunately there are people who really are scum. The author of the book seems as though he was a good seller who has turned to the ‘dark side’ after being repeatedly conned. However, having been in the same position, I can say that it is possible to just take the moral high ground and keep fighting the good fight.

  • Ella

    Precisely! Amazon.co.uk are more than happy to aid buyers to defraud sellers via their A-Z guarantee. Buyers can now get items at sellers’ expense by simply awaiting the arrival of their item & filing an A-Z guarantee. They can then send empty packages with tracking numbers and claim that they have returned the merchandise. Amazon then issue a full refund in response. I’m not surprised such a book exists – unfortunately there are people who really are scum. The author of the book seems as though he was a good seller who has turned to the ‘dark side’ after being repeatedly conned. However, having been in the same position, I can say that it is possible to just take the moral high ground and keep fighting the good fight.

  • nadiesabe

    I think this is happening to me right now on half.com. I only sell 4-5 used books at a time. I sold an expensive textbook to a buyer who has never purchased anything before. They sent en email saying that the book never arrived and they would have to file grievance if it didn’t show up. I stated the date and location it was sent from and estimated date of arrival (email was sent before it should have even arrived). Their next email stated package arrived with different book. I know what book I sent, but worry that half.com will cancel my account. This is ridiculous. Warning to others sellers to not sell to buyers who have never bought before or have no feedback. Still not sure what I will do.

  • nadiesabe

    I think this is happening to me right now on half.com. I only sell 4-5 used books at a time. I sold an expensive textbook to a buyer who has never purchased anything before. They sent en email saying that the book never arrived and they would have to file grievance if it didn’t show up. I stated the date and location it was sent from and estimated date of arrival (email was sent before it should have even arrived). Their next email stated package arrived with different book. I know what book I sent, but worry that half.com will cancel my account. This is ridiculous. Warning to others sellers to not sell to buyers who have never bought before or have no feedback. Still not sure what I will do.

  • Julie

    I left Ebay because of all the fee hikes and the DSR (five star rating system). With Ebay sellers losing all their rights, I decided to leave and go to Ecrater. I also tried Amazon. I started selling in the general Marketplace (“Everything Else category”) and all was fine. I upgraded to “Pro Merchant” and all went down hill. Amazon makes sure the buyer makes a legitimate purchase, but the “ship to” address can be a land fill or any address on the planet and Amazon does not check to see if that address is even in existence. The rule of Amazon is that the seller MUST ship to the address they provide you – no questions asked. If you feel leery, you can cancel the order and get negative feedback. If you ship to the address and the item is returned with “Return to Sender – Atttempted Unknown” and the buyer claims they never received their package, negative feedback is left, they file an A-Z complaint and you're out of luck as well. I sold a pricey item, emailed the buyer with her delivery confirmation number and all pertinent information. The emailed me back with F##K as every other word, stating she never made the purchase and not to send to to “that other person.” She wanted me to re-route the item to her. I spoke with Amazon Customer Service and was told to intercept the package, keep it until she inquired as to it's whereabouts. One month later, she filed an A-Z complaint, I was found to be at fault even though I uploaded every email she sent and the customer sevice emails.

    I have deleted my listings and will never sell on Amazon again. I also found my user id used by 6 other people and my feedback under those names. Aren't we supposed to be unique???????

    I've found that Amazon is NOT a safe place to sell.

    We are supposed to use UPC codes to list our items. One seller used her Crabtree & Evelyn items to list her Tupperwater items. When I went to list my Crabtree items, the UPC was taken, and I was blocked from listing. Her Crabtree listings were grocery items (beans, corn, bread). I reported her and Amazon did NOTHING.

    I called Ebay, and it turns out they will be changing their rating system. If they do, I may go back. In the mean time, I'll be on Ecrater and Bonanzle, whre I have my own unique user id, store name, prices and shipping rates.

  • http://tamebay.com/ Sue

    I've just ordered it, so I'll let you know what's in it…!!

  • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

    Should we encourage him with sales? ;-)

    Seriously, though, I'd be interested to hear what it's really like.

  • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

    Is depressed to learn just how many people find my website my searching for “How to scam on eBay”

    • pissedoffandjustbanned

      nah. I’m an honest guy. however, amazon did scam me out of cash. i intend return the compliment.

    • Kenistall

      Searching for that term to prevent being scammed. I have a buyer from Russia and don’t trust him – all just b/c of his address. 

      • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

        I know some people are distrustful of Russia/Italy etc but I’ve never had any blanket problems from any one area.

    • Timothy Allen

      Fear not of the moral fiber of at least one person! I only found your site via Google Images with “Ebay Photo Fail”, and have been reading your articles for the last half hour.
      I knew the possibility of something like this existed, but would NEVER use it, and would certainly not spend ~$20 to help me become a worse person. In my teenage days, back when the internet was somewhat new, I would take advantage of certain loopholes to get something for nothing, but found that I would really truly feel bad about doing something against a single person, rather than a faceless multimillion dollar corporation.
      For anyone considering actually using this, just think about the person – the actually PERSON – you’re stealing from. This person could be a single mother trying desperately to sell off what few things she has to feed her kids, or a dad in search of work, but selling off his few prized possessions to make next month’s rent. Your sole action could make someone’s kids go hungry or put them out on the street. You don’t know for sure, and probably never will… but it’s still possible. For me, just the possibility would be too much for even MY “bendable” conscience. If you feel you HAVE to scam someone, even if just to satisfy some evil desire – then at least be responsible enough to make the right decision on who to go after. I wouldn’t condone ANY of it myself, but if you’re going to do it any no one can stop you, then at least do it in a way that’s not going to hurt someone who really needs the money.

      • http://www.hillarydepiano.com/ Hillary

        Tim, your comment thrilled me because I so often find a blog, fall in love with it, and end up spending forever re-reading old posts and it never occurred to me anyone would do that with mine! :-)

        Thank you for stopping by!

        • Timothy Allen

          Several times a day I find myself looking for a diversion that will force me to stop working on my website (once I start writing code, I could go for a day and a half straight!), so when I need to hit the Emergency Shutoff for my brain, I’ll go Google something that I had always wondered but never bothered to look up, like the meaning of a word I’ve probably always misused, or who did the voice for that cartoon character that sounds so familiar.. I think that’s how I got here. If I’m not the only one who browses old posts on one person’s blog, I would have to say it’s because every page will have titles to other posts, and it catches my eye (as opposed to some blogs that just display links for months/years. I’m actually caught in the same little tornado of articles right now on a gaming site that has curiosity-provoking titles like “Top 20..” this-n-that. It’s a great marketing idea. Put the eye-catchers up front, keep people clicking the next link, don’t leave “dead-end links” (nothing interesting left to click over to), and so on. It’s no wonder I spend more time on WordPress blogs than any of the others. Why would I click a link entitled “October 2012″ if you haven’t told me first if there’s anything I’d like in there?

          Oops! Either I just went off-topic, got really long-winded, or temporarily forgot the short way to say “You’re welcome.” :)

  • http://tamebay.com/ Sue

    Feel cheered about your SEO instead :-D

  • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

    I worry about the moral fiber of my average visitor.

    But is guess if people are going to search for info on how to scam eBay, they might as well get sent to my site ;-)

  • http://amazonresellers.info/ Gary

    Amazon Buyer Scams

    The following shows how Amazon encourages unscrupulous buyers to obtain free merchandise at the expense of their reseller community. The Amazon reseller can expect to provide merchandise for buyers, ship the merchandise, issue a refund, and not receive the merchandise back from the buyer. The reseller may also be rewarded by not being allowed to sell on Amazon when the buyer scam is complete. Here is how it works:

    Feedback blackmail:

    Amazon encourages customers to rate their transactions with the Amazon Resellers. The buyers are also encouraged to communicate with the sellers prior to the writing of any negative feedback so that the seller can respond and correct any problem with the item. Unfortunately, over the past year more and more buyers use this contact to demand a full refund of the item without returning the item. They threaten to write a negative feedback unless their demands are met. Other sites provide a method of informing the site management when a buyer threatens the seller with this action. Amazon offers no such methodology and in fact does not encourage or provide a method to show resellers which buyers repeat this activity or constantly try to cheat resellers. No buyer rating systems is encouraged.

    Resellers have noted a sharp increase in attempts by buyers to claim that merchandise is damaged, in poor condition, or did not arrive. Savvy resellers find that when they ask the buyer to return the merchandise or threaten to have the post office investigate that the buyer drops the claim. Some buyers will place a bogus bad feedback without sending an email in advance so that the seller can correct any problem. They assume that the seller will refund the sale and let them keep the merchandise if they remove the feedback. They probably do not realize that Amazon gives resellers a negative rating for any and all refunds. Refunding the buyer at this point would merely substitute one negative rating for another.

    Buyer manipulation is not the most serious buyer scam method. Experienced buyers quickly learn that other methods to receive free merchandise have become nearly 100% guaranteed:

    Amazon’s A-to-Z Guarantee:

    When customers have a problem with a transaction made through Marketplace Payments by Amazon they may request that Amazon arbitrate the situation. They are asked to first contact the seller to give them a chance to address the issue at hand. The prior contact request is only a suggestion and is not required by Amazon. Many buyers now go directly to the A-to-Z Guarantee page to submit their claims.

    Several years ago, claims appeared to be researched by Amazon and obviously bogus buyer claims were handled by Amazon. Amazon either refunded the buyer’s money or denied the claim. Legitimate claims seemed to be mostly handled directly by the sellers prior to any A-to-Z submission. At least that was the experience of the author of this site, an Amazon Reseller since 2001.

    For the past few years, nearly 100% of all Amazon A-to-Z Claims have been automatically decided in favor of the buyers, regardless of any evidence presented by Amazon Resellers. The refunds now are deducted from reseller funds held by Amazon. The buyer keeps the merchandise and has no obligation to return the item. The buyers are not required to return the merchandise to Amazon or the seller. They are not required to show the damaged, copied media, or wrong merchandise to Amazon or the reseller. The reseller is not allowed to see whether the so-called suspect item was what was actually shipped.

    The author of this comment was a victim of the above scam. The buyer claimed that a DVD was “recopied media”. This seller explained to Amazon that the item was a factory-sealed DVD. It was a standard Amazon listing item that happened to be in the public domain and is available from several manufacturers. No copyright infringement was possible. Since it was sealed and there was no way of determining the actual quality of the item, this reseller told Amazon to refund the full cost of the item. Amazon issued an automated warning to the seller about selling “recopied media” apparently based on the buyers unsubstantiated claim. This bogus claim was used as a “prior warning” to terminate this Amazon Reseller when a second bogus claim under the following scam method was submitted by a buyer.

    The Amazon Reseller Community Rules Scam:

    Amazon has an extensive list of rules that the resellers must adhere to in order to sell merchandise on the site.

    Prohibited Content is listed:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display….

    Buyers are instructed by Amazon to report any violations:

    “Report a Community Rules Violation If you receive an item from a third-party Marketplace seller that may be in violation of our Community Rules, report it to us via our Contact Us form. Select “Report a Community Rules Violation” from the drop-down menu, and include all relevant information. All reports are investigated thoroughly, though for privacy reasons we do not share the results of our investigations. “

    Amazon states for the buyer that they do not share any results [or information] of any investigation. That includes informing the buyer so they may know what sale was being investigated and whether the item the buyer is complaining about was what was actually sent. Even if a buyer was required to send the item to Amazon, Amazon would not be able to verify that that was what the seller sent to the buyer. The seller has no way of knowing what item was in question and is not allowed to defend themselves against the scammer.

    Thus the buyer receives free merchandise and the cost is refunded. If, as happened to the author of this site and many other resellers, the buyer claims that the item was “recopied media”, the reseller is suspended permanently by Amazon. Amazon uses this no tolerance, no verification policy to destroy legitimate long-standing, highly rated resellers and award these scammers merchandise stolen from these resellers.

    Amazon provides a form so that scammers may easily obtain their free merchandise that resellers have no recourse to prevent. They merely click on the “contact us” in the Report a Community Rules Violation as shown above on the Amazon.com website to obtain the following form:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/reports/contact-us

    To:
    Amazon Reports

    From:

    Subject:

    Report a violation of our rules

    Comments:

    Please visit Your account to check on the status of your orders.

    Order #:

    Comments:

    Thank you for reporting a community rules violation. Please provide as much information as possible.

    Seller Nickname:

    Order #:

    Listing ID (0000-Z-000000):

    Comments:

    During the several weeks in October 2009 surrounding the period of the reseller destruction event described in the letter to Jeff Bezos on the main page at the site amazonresellers.info, the following was observed. A search on the subject “recopied media” produced the Amazon prohibited contents list which at the time included the above form and instructions on the same page. Amazon has since moved the form to a separate page. It is no longer the top search result. The scammers may now be well educated and do not require the search information in order to continue the scam,

    A large number of those surveyed regarding these policies of Amazon and how they are being utilized to eliminate Amazon Resellers suspect that many of the scammers are other Amazon Resellers. If this is true, these resellers could order merchandise, obtain a refund for the merchandise, resell the merchandise, and eliminate a competitor reseller in one swoop. Amazon claims to provide extensive tracking procedures to insure that a suspended reseller cannot rejoin the Amazon Marketplace using a different name. They check credit cards, ISPs, zip codes, and any other relationships to suspended accounts to prevent the reseller’s return. If Amazon were interested in eliminating scams or protecting their legitimate resellers, they would be implementing these same procedures to try and identify buyers and resellers who are behind some of these scams.

    Refunds are bad!;

    During 2009 Amazon initiated an additional evaluation criteria for resellers. They began tracking this negative rating methodology for resellers on the basis of the number of refunds they issued to buyers. These rating are not compared with the actual orders but rather they were like other rating criteria were judged only against positive ratings by the buyers who chose to submit a positive feedback.

    These ratings are utilized as one evaluation criteria to suspend or stop Amazon Resellers from continue to sell on Amazon. This has proved especially detrimental to newer resellers who have yet to establish enough positive feedback to offset a few refunds. Amazon does not discriminate as to what may have caused the refund. Any refund for any reason is considered to be negative. This includes buyer remorse when the buyer cancels the order before it is shipped or before or after it arrives. Once Amazon has collected their fees, any refund is bad for the reseller. If the buyer also submits a poor feedback rating, the reseller will receive a negative report in two different lists for the same transaction.

    Amazon Resellers are becoming more and more reluctant to give buyer refunds, even when they are deemed to be legitimate. The negative Amazon refund evaluation has to be weighed each time against a potential negative feedback.

    Amazon provides no discount on the shipping and handling costs to the buyer for multiple items from the same seller on the same order. The author of this site began offering buyers a rebate for a portion of the shipping and handling costs for additional items ordered. It was stopped as soon as it was noted that even these rebates of a few dollars were treated as being full refunds on the refund negative rating list.

    Amazon encourages their buyers to return any merchandise for a refund as part of their “Buyer-Centric” mantra. They then turn around and punish the resellers who actually implement this policy. Catch 22? Amazon hypocrisy?

    For more information visit http://www.amazonresellers.info

  • mark

    I use to sell on ebay, apple iphones. What a mess!! I lost thousands and the people got free apple iphones. I had a Russian client that got a free apple iphone. He simply disputed the $1,299.99 and Paypal took the money from my bank!! Never be a seller on ebay or amazon. They will keep your money and the buyer will get there merchandise for free. It's all a big scam. Ane were having the CEO of ebay as our next California governor. Sounds scary. Im sure she'll screw us up even more.

    • Bwalsh1975

      Umm, I would dispute a $1299.99 iPhone as well.

  • mark

    I use to sell on ebay, apple iphones. What a mess!! I lost thousands and the people got free apple iphones. I had a Russian client that got a free apple iphone. He simply disputed the $1,299.99 and Paypal took the money from my bank!! Never be a seller on ebay or amazon. They will keep your money and the buyer will get there merchandise for free. It’s all a big scam. Ane were having the CEO of ebay as our next California governor. Sounds scary. Im sure she’ll screw us up even more.

  • d00d

    Last Oct I was victim of an eBay scam. I dont have a store and only sold a few items on eBay with positive feedback. An eBay user bought my first high priced item I put on eBay. Filed a dispute before he even got it stating he couldnt follow the tracking number and just like that he already had his money back. He DID NOT email me prior to filing a dispute. Once he received it he claimed it didnt work and surprisingly he shipped it back. He commented more on the claim which I had no email notice on so I knew nothing of it until I stumbled upon it on the website. You would think paypal would send an automated email when someone makes a statement on a dispute you are apart of but apparently they do not. The buyer must of shipped back the product as a good “f you” because when I got it back it had been gutted. Hardware pulled out and replaced with broken hardware. Even had some broken stuff scotch taped. Paypal said the buyer claimed it was in that condition when he got it…..If it doesnt work whats he doing taking it apart and then sending it back? What does Paypal(eBay) have to say about it?

    “We make this decision based on the guidelines outlined in our User
    Agreement and after careful consideration of all available materials
    provided by buyer and seller.”

    If you really want to scam someone on eBay its simple. Buy you something, for example a PC. For good measure go ahead and file a dispute before you even get it and be sure to NOT email the seller throughout this entire scam. Screw the seller with a limp one. Take all the hardware out of the PC(mobo, intel i7, ddr3 ram, bluray burner, ect). Replace hardware with parts from your computer from 1987. File another dispute stating the PC doesnt work. It CAME with old parts. I guess its up to you if you get pleasure by shipping back the 1987 PC to the seller. Merry Christmas, a new free PC.

    A little advice to eBay sellers. If you get into a situation like that and you do get the item back. Do not click the ONLY option paypal provides you. Honestly I dont know what to tell you to do because you probably have nothing you can do. After I got my item back I ticked the only option which was stating I had the item back and BAM! case was closed. I was looking for more options after I stated I had the item back. Options where I could state its new condition which was trashed.

    Paypal has been calling my cell since Oct tryin to collect the money. I emailed and emailed and they have finally started responding but the case is final and they are done with it. I installed MagiCall on my HTC Imagio and now my cell just ignores the number they call from. That bastard gave me my FIRST and ONLY negative feedback. Guess I’m done with eBay and I really liked it….as a buyer.

    • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

      Did you call? Even when the situation seems completely hopeless, sometimes the solution is a quick phone call away.

  • Rainbowshine

    I’ve not read this book but from experience there are loads of aways to scam sellers, one is if an item is sent by standard delivery (to keep costs down) and you have no tracking number. If the buyer pretends they never received the item, then paypal sides with them even if you have a postage certificate as you won’t have a tracking code. Therefore not only does the buyer get their money back, but the item as well and they get to give you negative feedback. All the while you’ve lost out on money and the item is gone. What a con. How do I know this? It happened to me on Ebay (United kingdom).Another is if you fancy an item you already own that is broken for free, buy a new duplicate version then pretend it got damaged in transit, take a photograph of your old broken version (e.g a figurine) and you get a refund or even better the seller sends out another to try and keep buyer happy and avoid negative feedback. Two for the price of one or a full refund.
    Ebay is way too biased towards buyers but in the end sellers are their clients too as they make so much money out of them. Yes buyers have rights but so do sellers and it’s so easy for legitimate sellers to get conned on there.
    DISGRACEFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Hello Zombie63

      Where is all the talk about how SELLERS scam buyers? MY only experience with EBay is as a buyer and I have been scammed repeatedly by bad buyers who place shil bids and I have never gotten ANY recourse from EBay. You cannot even complain about such a seller. Look, I am sure there is some fraud on the part of buyers BUT, the SELLING FRAUD came first and when it migrated to the buyers, then the sellers became pissed that their picnic was over. EBay is a gamble, and nobody wins anymore.

  • Chainsawyo522

    There’s a shortage of info on the web on scams. I’m a new seller and want to know what to watch for, as well as trying to figure out if I’m being scammed by another seller. He listed an uncirculated 1885 Morgan Silver Dollar but misspelled silver as Sivler. I got the item at a descent price ($30) and was feeling rewarded for what was about a 3 hour browsing session (similar coins are selling up to $150) After waiting a week and seeing that he still had not mailed it I finally got an email to my private email address that said he could not find the item and suspected his grandson of taking it out of his desk drawer. He has a 100% positive feedback score of 700+ and I have no reason to discount his story other than the fact that I was actually excited about my ‘find’ and his reluctance to respond quickly. He said that if he doesn’t find it by Monday he will refund my money. I’m horrible at these types of judgement calls and don’t want to over react. I know it’s a binding contract and all, and don’t want to report negatively on a hunch. I also don’t think it’s right for anyone to do this without it being noted, what’s the point of tracking and giving feedback if we don’t use it when something out of the norm happens? What if he’s done this before? Anyone have any suggestions?

    • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

      With 100% feedback and the fact that he’s been answering your emails regularly, I’d say to definitely give him the benefit of the doubt that he’s tell the truth. If you got your money back, that’s really not a case for leaving negative feedback. But, just for fun, I’ll post this on the main blog tomorrow and let the mob weigh in and see what everyone else thinks so you can get a range of opinions.

    • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

      With 100% feedback and the fact that he’s been answering your emails regularly, I’d say to definitely give him the benefit of the doubt that he’s tell the truth. If you got your money back, that’s really not a case for leaving negative feedback. But, just for fun, I’ll post this on the main blog tomorrow and let the mob weigh in and see what everyone else thinks so you can get a range of opinions.

    • JimGuest

      It sounds like you are trying to take advantage of some poor soul’s spelling mistake. Are you really complaining that you can’t rip off an old man by paying him $120 less than what the item is valued at? It’s people like you that are the problem on eBay.

  • Thiago

    It’s amazing how people get away with these scams. Where’s the law enforcement? There must be a way to report these scammy buyers to the Post Office or Police, surely. Also, if there are so many articles on the internet in regards to these scams, how come people still decide to sell on Ebay?

    Ebay and Paypal need to be investigated because they’ve both scammed me out of my money along with a couple of buyers. The first time was when I sold a Playstation 3 controller and got charged back (about 4 years ago). That was the last time I sold on Ebay. The second time was this year when I gave an SEO consultation to a bloke in Belgium. I helped him get top search engine rankings in 1 week. Before I knew it, he gave me a chargeback as it seemed he used a fraudulent card. It could even have been Paypal, so he must of thought OK, somehow I got a consultation for free, cool.

    It’s a complete and utter disgrace. Even on Ebay’s website you cannot see any banner for seller protection, but you do see a banner for buyer protection everywhere. Another institution scamming people out of money and earning money in between. It’s funny how they never return the listing fee. The Virtual Mafia on the loose.

  • Dmana3172

    I have sold items on Amazon for over a year until June when they started to review my account for 30 days. Then they suspended my account and hold my money for another 90 days and claimed that I was reselling used software which was opened while in fact I was only selling new software that is never opened. Then Amazon denied my appeal and won’t answer anymore email. Just last week, someone at Amazon.com who stored all my credit card information has stole my credit card numbers and used it for $400 to travel to Spain and $1.00 on the other card for the railroad travel. I’m not kidding you as this happened on Friday morning on August 19, 2011. I was notified by my bank and credit card company about it and they shut down my credit card immediately (both my debit card and paypal extras mastercard) due to those transaction fraud and I knew I provided both of my credit card only to Amazon before. Now, I’m waiting for a new credit card which take about a week.

    Sellers, please be aware that this is no joke! You or Amazon do not have a merchant account to secure you so whenever you provide your banking account and credit card numbers to amazon, anyone at Amazon can gain access to those information and are suspicious to hackers. Beware!!!!

  • Superguest

    I’ve never had problems with Amazon, but then again, I can kind of tell which companies are good to go with.

    Now, about 50% of the SHIT I’ve bought on ebay, was exactly that.
    Shit.
    Glasses with peeling fronts, RCA adapters that looked like they had an anvil land on them, fake watches, etc.

    I was reading the ebay scam guides and I couldn’t help but laugh.
    There’s a huge wall of text explaining how to avoid getting scammed when I only need A SINGLE sentence!

    DO NOT BUY OR SELL ANYTHING EXPENSIVE ON EBAY!

    You WILL get scammed!  Anything above $100 on ebay is an asshole magnet.  Even the third party companies that are supposed to help insure a smooth transaction are fraudulent as hell!

    Just avoid that mess.  Pay the extra $10 for your $250 headphones and AVOID the hassle that is ebay!

    • Superguest

      Actually, just don’t buy anything on ebay.  Even the cheap crap is trashed.
      New = terribly damaged and used = terribly damaged in a smoking environment and submersed in boiling water for 5 minutes!

      • JimGuest

        Actually, you couldn’t be more wrong. Just because you were not smart enough to buy from reputable sellers doesn’t mean everything on eBay is trash. What is trash is the items that YOU chose to buy. Buy from Top Rated sellers with 100% feedback and you won’t have any problems.

    • http://www.hillarydepiano.com Hillary

      I buy on eBay very frequently and don’t have any issues but I love to leave comments like these up so that sellers understand the attitude many buyers have going in and can adjust accordingly.

      There are a lot of people like this who go in expecting to get burned so that’s another hurdle to winning them over.

      • Louis

        People ask how this book can exist. I ask, how can sites like Amazon knowingly let people scam sellers.

        I sent a customer a laptop part in one piece. It did not fit his laptop because he bought the wrong part after avoiding every warning. He tried to make it fit by breaking it into three pieces. He sent it back this way. He claims damage in shipping. Shipping cracks or bends items, it does not separate delicate internal components and neatly rearrange them to fit together precisely. Amazon not only gave him his full refund, but also booted us off the site for poor customer service.

        You just have to be prepared to take it in the ass to sell on these sites. I’ve been close to the dark side. My HTC Sensation is fairly beat up. There are nights where I figured, why not buy a new phone and send this one back in the box. In the end, the scammers will be punished, and if you run an honest business, you will make too much money to care about the small amount the scammers take away. 

  • steve

    I, getting screwed out of 2-7grand right now after saying i was protected as a seller if i get sigmiture confirmation on gold ive been saving sellers beware dont except paypal

  • Syne

    Amazon need to be sued for immoral business practices. Another great company need to take over amazon. A company that value great business practices over profit. Amazon need to be stop. Amazon sellers unite and we can end their abuse once and for all. I feel like starting a company now. Not for profit but for customer and seller satisfaction.

    • MM

       I got scammed on Amazon. Purchased a camera from a seller, they never sent the item but kept the money. They provided me with bogus tracking information as well!!

  • Carl

    I should defend e-bay but can’t. I was a seller there years ago and quit in disgust. I went back a week ago and sold an item as a For Parts Only auction. I felt I’d be safe selling a low priced item for the buyer to fix and re-sell. I was wrong. Buyer files an item not as described report. He got his money back and still has my item. He will now fix that item and resell it on e-bay. He may get as much as $80. for it. I hope someone scams him out of it.

    • Kyle

       Buy it and file a dispute telling them that he is reselling items and selling them as refurbished when they are still broken. Get your $80 back and get your item back fixed. Lose just shipping cost and get a fixed item. Of course I am only kidding. Hate people using these shady practices. I am fighting someone now on Amazon, but as the BUYER. So don’t think they always side with the buyer every time. I bought the item and it was supposed to arrive 4 days ago, still nothing.

  • Asnaeb

    Now I am getting worried that I might get scammed after reading all the posts here.
    A customer bought 10 tablet PCs from me and paid immediately, as it was required by me. Total transaction amount is 650 USD.
    He asked me to ship all the items separately, one item/package due to lower risk at the customs. I did that for him. I shipped the 10 packages with airmail with tracking. But I read now that signature confirmation is required over 250 USD. I do not have it since I shipped all the packages with simple China airmail with trackings.
    Now if my buyer claims that he did not receive the order, PayPal will take my money away? Even if I tell them that I shipped all the 10 tablet PCs separately? Thanks!

  • heterodox

    Having been a buyer and a seller, I can commiserate. There is no shortage of scumbag sellers who either outright rip off buyers, or just annoy the hell out of them (withhold refunds, etc.). But there are buyers who are just as scummy. They’ll buy something, use it, return it damaged, and demand a refund.

    Basically, humans are shit, and I hate everyone.